Interview with Trustee David McMurtrie

David's Story

We caught up with ScotsCare Trustee David McMurtrie ahead of Volunteers week, to chat about how he came to ScotsCare and how the reality has compared with expectations.

Why did you want to become a Trustee? And how long have you been a Trustee at ScotsCare?

I’ve been a Trustee at ScotsCare for 5 years. I first wanted to become involved as a way of doing something away from work which made use of my skill set and where I would not only be helping other people but also gaining experience myself.

What attracted you to ScotsCare?

I’m a proud Scot but had never really felt part of a larger Scottish community in London and realised that many Scots living in London were not as fortunate as myself. Becoming involved with ScotsCare provided that connection to the community of Scots and gave me the opportunity to do something practical for the benefit of those living in less fortunate circumstances. I first got involved through organising a Burns Night at work and approaching ScotsCare to be the charity for the evening.

How have you been able to use your relevant skill base in your Trustee role? Have you learnt new skills?

My career has been in media, advertising and communications and I now Chair the Communications Sub-Committee of ScotsCare. It has been a natural fit and by sitting on other Sub-Committees of the charity I’ve also learned new skills e.g. Audit and Welfare

What has surprised you most about the charity’s work since taking up your role?

The breadth of ScotsCare’s work never fails to impress me, ranging from straightforward financial support through to counselling and advocacy services, not forgetting the sheltered accommodation run by ScotsCare.

How have you found balancing Trustee work with your day job?

I’ve recently stopped working in a full-time role, so have more time to spend on my Trustee work. When I was working full time, balancing urgent work priorities or business travel with Trustee work could occasionally be challenging. However, Trustee meetings are planned for the year ahead so most of the time it was easy to block out time in my work calendar.

What would you say to other prospective Trustees about being a Trustee at ScotsCare?

Get actively involved, it will be one of the most rewarding things you ever do.

What have you found most satisfying about being a Trustee to date?

Reviewing Welfare committee case studies each quarter allows me to witness the impact of ScotsCare’s work. This makes my role as a Trustee truly rewarding, and I feel I am making a positive contribution. The passion and dedication that everyone at ScotsCare brings to their role, from employees and case workers to volunteers and Trustees, is inspiring.

Why do you think the role of a Trustee is important?

On one level, the Trustee role is incredibly important in terms of ensuring good governance and oversight of the work that the charity carries out to fulfil its purposes. At the same time, knowing that collectively we are helping to shape the future direction of the charity and helping management make the right decisions is equally important.

Is there a particular moment at ScotsCare that stands out to you?

The ScotsCare choir is made up of clients and volunteers and brings joy to everyone who participates. Every time I hear them sing, I feel emotional.

We caught up with ScotsCare Trustee David McMurtrie ahead of Volunteers week, to chat about how he came to ScotsCare and how the reality has compared with expectations.

Why did you want to become a Trustee? And how long have you been a Trustee at ScotsCare?

I’ve been a Trustee at ScotsCare for 5 years. I first wanted to become involved as a way of doing something away from work which made use of my skill set and where I would not only be helping other people but also gaining experience myself.

What attracted you to ScotsCare?

I’m a proud Scot but had never really felt part of a larger Scottish community in London and realised that many Scots living in London were not as fortunate as myself. Becoming involved with ScotsCare provided that connection to the community of Scots and gave me the opportunity to do something practical for the benefit of those living in less fortunate circumstances. I first got involved through organising a Burns Night at work and approaching ScotsCare to be the charity for the evening.

How have you been able to use your relevant skill base in your Trustee role? Have you learnt new skills?

My career has been in media, advertising and communications and I now Chair the Communications Sub-Committee of ScotsCare. It has been a natural fit and by sitting on other Sub-Committees of the charity I’ve also learned new skills e.g. Audit and Welfare

What has surprised you most about the charity’s work since taking up your role?

The breadth of ScotsCare’s work never fails to impress me, ranging from straightforward financial support through to counselling and advocacy services, not forgetting the sheltered accommodation run by ScotsCare.

How have you found balancing Trustee work with your day job?

I’ve recently stopped working in a full-time role, so have more time to spend on my Trustee work. When I was working full time, balancing urgent work priorities or business travel with Trustee work could occasionally be challenging. However, Trustee meetings are planned for the year ahead so most of the time it was easy to block out time in my work calendar.

What would you say to other prospective Trustees about being a Trustee at ScotsCare?

Get actively involved, it will be one of the most rewarding things you ever do.

What have you found most satisfying about being a Trustee to date?

Reviewing Welfare committee case studies each quarter allows me to witness the impact of ScotsCare’s work. This makes my role as a Trustee truly rewarding, and I feel I am making a positive contribution. The passion and dedication that everyone at ScotsCare brings to their role, from employees and case workers to volunteers and Trustees, is inspiring.

Why do you think the role of a Trustee is important?

On one level, the Trustee role is incredibly important in terms of ensuring good governance and oversight of the work that the charity carries out to fulfil its purposes. At the same time, knowing that collectively we are helping to shape the future direction of the charity and helping management make the right decisions is equally important.

Is there a particular moment at ScotsCare that stands out to you?

The ScotsCare choir is made up of clients and volunteers and brings joy to everyone who participates. Every time I hear them sing, I feel emotional.

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